News

Trump to nominate Gene Scalia, son of late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, for secretary of labor

Citizens for Legitimate Government - Fri, 07/19/2019 - 18:31

Trump to nominate Gene Scalia, son of late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, for secretary of labor | 19 July 2019 | President Trump on Thursday night announced he's nominating attorney Gene Scalia, the son of the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, to replace Alex Acosta as secretary of labor. The surprise move -- which top Republicans privately supported -- was a visible manifestation of the close personal bond Trump has forged with the Scalia family in recent years. The confirmation process for Justice Neil Gorsuch, who ultimately filled Justice Scalia's seat, sparked the connection...Scalia, 55, is expected to face headwinds from Democrats in his Senate confirmation hearings, in part because he routinely has represented major corporations in key cases involving workers' rights.

Categories: News

Iran confiscates British tanker in Strait of Hormuz - IRGC

Citizens for Legitimate Government - Fri, 07/19/2019 - 18:27

Iran confiscates British tanker in Strait of Hormuz - IRGC | 19 July 2019 | The Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps has seized the British oil tanker Stena Impero in the Strait of Hormuz, Iranian media reported. UK authorities said the tanker had 'veered off course' before capture. The Stena Impero was headed to Saudi Arabia but left the international sea lanes and headed north towards the Iranian island of Qeshm, marine tracking data showed on Friday. The 30,000-ton tanker is owned by Stena Bulk, and was bound for the Saudi port of Al Jubail.

Categories: News

Ilhan Omar introduces pro-BDS resolution, announces visit to Israel

Citizens for Legitimate Government - Fri, 07/19/2019 - 18:24

Ilhan Omar introduces pro-BDS resolution, announces visit to Israel --The resolution aims to affirm 'the right to participate in boycotts in pursuit of civil and human rights at home and abroad' and was co-sponsored by Reps. Rashida Tlaib and John Lewis. | 18 July 2019 | US Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) put forth a new 'pro-boycott' resolution in Congress "affirming that all Americans have the right to participate in boycotts in pursuit of civil and human rights at home and abroad, as protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution." While the resolution does not mention the acronym BDS, it seems clear that this was a response to an anti-BDS resolution...Omar's action was in response to the House Foreign Affairs Committee moving forward with five pro-Israel bills, three of which are resolutions with declarative purpose, and two others bills that seek to sanction supporters of Hamas and to make improvements to the defense and security assistance to Israel.

Categories: News

America’s Big Bet on Selling Fracked Gas to China and the World

deSmog - Fri, 07/19/2019 - 18:08
LNG carrier shipRead time: 8 mins

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is getting a lot of attention these days, with U.S. producers making major investments in the infrastructure to produce and export LNG to China and the rest of the world for the next several decades.

That's despite LNG looking like a big bet that may not ever pay off. 

Tags: LNGfrackingexportsUS Chinaliquefied natural gas (LNG)
Categories: News

Brightly Shows How Worker-Owned Cooperatives Can Scale Up

Grassroots Economic Survival - Fri, 07/19/2019 - 17:05
Link: Brightly Shows How Worker-Owned Cooperatives Can Scale Up

One group of cooperatives that has created a well-designed initiative to scale is Brightly, a franchise of worker-owned cooperatives in New York City that offers cleaning services. Brightly is a licensed nonprofit franchise developed with support from the Center for Family Life, which is a community-based organization that has been incubating worker cooperatives for over a decade. 

Traditionally, franchise agreements include the purchase of the local franchised business and royalties for training and for using the franchisee’s brand. The Brightly worker cooperative franchise is different. First, the franchise is a nonprofit endeavor. Secondly, there is no upfront franchise fee and a very lenient non-compete clause, according to Phyllis Robinson, who coordinates the project at the Center for Family Life. 

The franchise attempts to remove the barriers involved in successfully starting a worker-owned cooperative. By providing access to a strong brand with visibility in the marketplace and shared resources to reduce costs, a franchise of worker-owned cooperatives enables low-income entrepreneurs to grow their businesses. 

The process of forming the Brightly franchise agreements was complex since Brightly aimed to mold conventional franchise documents to serve the interests of Brightly workers. 

“We met weekly with the members of the cooperatives to go through the 202-page [legal] document and pulled out the clauses that weren’t fair to them,” Robinson explained. “[The workers] pushed us on it and, in the end, we all got to a really positive agreement.”

Read the rest at Triple Pundit

 

Go to the GEO front page

Categories: News

Federal judge upholds Trump's expansion of non-ObamaCare plans

Citizens for Legitimate Government - Fri, 07/19/2019 - 16:56

Federal judge upholds Trump's expansion of non-ObamaCare plans | 19 July 2019 | A federal judge on Friday upheld the Trump administration's expansion of health insurance plans that don't meet ObamaCare's coverage requirements. U.S. District Judge Richard Leon in Washington ruled against the insurance companies that sued the administration in an attempt to block the rules. "Not only is any potential negative impact from the 2018 rule minimal, but its benefits are undeniable," Leon wrote about the regulations.

Categories: News

US report says a Green New Deal must help electric co-ops switch to renewables

Grassroots Economic Survival - Fri, 07/19/2019 - 16:32
Link: US report says a Green New Deal must help electric co-ops switch to renewables

As more and more electric co-ops across the USA signal a growing interest in renewable energy, a report has called for a new programme to transition rural economies to clean power.

The document, Rural Electrification 2.0, says: “The US public is increasingly demanding clean energy to pursue energy independence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

“As the price of renewables​ has dropped, investments in new clean energy generation have accelerated. Generation from solar and wind is expected to grow by 6% and 14% respectively in 2019.

“Maintaining flexibility in energy resources is key to controlling costs as the US shifts to carbon-free energy.”

Written by Erik Hatlestad, CURE (Clean Up the River Environment Minnesota); Katie Rock, Center for Rural Affairs; and Liz Veazey, of Omaha non-profit We Own It, the report says electric co-ops currently source 67% of their energy from fossils – despite “providing the infrastructure for a clean energy future through transmission lines, wind turbines, and utility-scale solar”.

It says the falling cost of renewables have removed a barrier to switching to renewables.

Read the rest at Co-operative News

 

Go to the GEO front page

Categories: News

Anarchist place (Steki) of self-organized collectives of anarchist immigrants

Anarchist News - Fri, 07/19/2019 - 13:16

From Act for Freedom! (Athens, Greece)

Today 17 July 19, we the self-organized collective of anarchist immigrants together with other self-organized collectives and individuals in solidarity occupied an abandoned shop at the corner of Tsamadou/Tositsa streets, Exarchia.

Our goals to use this steki as the self-organized collective of anarchist immigrants are:
1- a centre of struggle for anarchist immigrants
2- self-organizing immigrants for common struggle and building relations between the immigrant communities and the movement
3- a collective cafeteria in solidarity with political prisoners
4- education activity

Our opinions on the identity of squat:

A- the squat is not the goal of struggle but is the tool of struggle, which means: the struggle should happen in the street and the squat is a help to organize the social struggles which should happen in the street.

B- the squat should be a social open space, creating open activity for society. For example: open education classes etc…

C- the steki of self-organized anarchist immigrants will not be a housing project. In our opinion: it is not a project to occupy a space for housing. Housing by squatting a place is only a project when the squat is a social political space and is active for struggle in the neighbourhood and other areas.

D- in the squat decisions should be taken in the collective way and the assemblies should be with no authority or hierarchical situation.
In reference to our opinion on squatting, we are struggling to SQUAT THE WORLD.

Since the puppet of the greek regime “NEO DEMOCRATIA” have said: they will clean up Exarchia, so our steki as the first occupation since the existence of the new government is a big political slap in the face for them. With reference to the opinion of our injured comrade: even if you massacre all of us, you can’t destroy resistance and this is not a personal point but is our collective point of view.
self-organized collective of anarchist immigrants 17 July 2019

source
https://athens.indymedia.org/post/1599155/

Tags: Greeceathensimmigration
Categories: News

House holds Barr, Ross in criminal contempt over census documents

Citizens for Legitimate Government - Fri, 07/19/2019 - 04:38

House holds Barr, Ross in criminal contempt over census documents | 17 July 2019 | The U.S. House of Representatives voted on Wednesday to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in criminal contempt for defying congressional subpoenas related to the U.S. census. The measure, which passed 230-198, was a response to the cabinet members' failure to produce documents requested by House Democrats...Four Democrats voted against the measure, while no Republicans supported it. Justin Amash, an independent congressman from Michigan who recently left the Republican Party, voted in favor of the resolution.

Categories: News

Ebola spread to east Congo's Goma massively raises risk

Citizens for Legitimate Government - Fri, 07/19/2019 - 04:07

Ebola spread to east Congo's Goma massively raises risk --"The case in Goma could potentially be a game changer in this epidemic," the WHO director-general said. | 15 July 2019 | Ebola's arrival in eastern Congo's main city of Goma severely raises the risk of the virus spreading if it takes root in this metropolis near the border with Rwanda, the World Health Organization (WHO) warned on Monday. U.N. officials and donors met in Geneva to discuss how to tackle the world's second worst epidemic, which has infected 2,500 people and killed 1,655 in the lush farmlands of eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. A toxic mix of armed militias and a deep-rooted mistrust of health officials by communities have hampered efforts to halt the virus.

Categories: News

US Navy shoots down Iranian drone in Strait of Hormuz - Trump

Citizens for Legitimate Government - Thu, 07/18/2019 - 22:36

US Navy shoots down Iranian drone in Strait of Hormuz - Trump | 18 July 2019 | Shortly after entering the Persian Gulf, a US warship shot down an Iranian drone that had approached to within less than a kilometer, US President Donald Trump said at a White House press event. Amphibious assault ship USS Boxer took "defensive action" against an Iranian drone that approached to within 1,000 yards (900 meters), and ignored multiple calls to stand down, Trump said on Thursday...The Boxer sailed into the Persian Gulf earlier in the day, following the reports that the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps had seized the Panamanian-flagged oil tanker MT Riah and its 12-man crew.

Categories: News

Strike While the Iron is Hot: #DivestfromICE Victories and the Movement Moving Forward

It's Goin Down - Thu, 07/18/2019 - 20:55

The post Strike While the Iron is Hot: #DivestfromICE Victories and the Movement Moving Forward appeared first on It's Going Down.

Report from the Block the Wall Network on recent victories won by the anti-ICE divestment campaign and where things can go from here.

As the Abolish ICE movement erupts again, private prison corporations contracting with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to detain migrants are feeling the heat. GEO Group and CoreCivic, who together exert near duopolistic power over the private prison sector, have been hit hard by a wave bank divestments. In just a few weeks, some of the industry’s leading lenders, Bank of America, SunTrust and BNP Paribas (parent company of Bank of the West) all announced plans to cut ties with private prisons. They join JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo, who agreed to cease further financing the companies in March 2019.

The majority of immigrant detainees (around 70%) are imprisoned in detention centers operated by private prison companies like CoreCivic and GEO Group. These companies are structured as Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs), which makes them particularly reliant on financing from large financial institutions and vulnerable to credit loss. Stocks in the industry are reeling, with CoreCivic down 27% and GEO down 22% over the last month. As GEO leadership admitted in May, divestment jeopardizes the industry’s future.

Private prison company GEO Group is warning investors that growing public pressure to divest from the private prison industry “could have a material adverse effect on our business.” – Newsweek

The divestments have roughly correlated with a groundswell of rebellion. Large swathes of U.S. society are recoiling in the face of the draconian xenophobia of the Trump administration, particularly after conditions detailing the mass detention of migrant children were revealed. Never Again Action and Movimiento Cosecha have revived the disruptive spirit of Occupy ICE from a year ago, launching new rounds of blockades at detention centers, ICE Field Offices and the offices of political leaders.

In mid-June Block the Wall Network and Olympia Assembly released call for a week of action against ICE profiteers from July 8th-12th. Identifying private prisons as a weak link within the deportation and detention infrastructure, the call urged coordinated direct action to shut down bank branches of Bank of America, PNC Bank, SunTrust and Bank of the West. Before the week of action began, Bank of America divested, SunTrust divested on July 8th and Bank of the West followed suit on July 12th; PNC remains invested as of this writing.

During the week, Bank of the West branches were shuttered on multiple occasions in Seattle and Portland, anarchists took action against PNC in NYC and Asheville and ICE-tech collaborators Microsoft, Amazon and Palantir all faced protests. Phone zaps were also organized against PNC and Bank of the West branches. Although much credit must be extended to longstanding divestment campaigners, the intervention of anti-authoritarians advancing an explicit direct action strategy into the movement could have been the last straw for some financial firms.

Widespread and targeted disruption can also likely explain the failure of Trump’s promised mass ICE raids to materialize. Here, the heroic sabotage of transportation infrastructure at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, WA by Willem Van Spronsen warrants specific mention in most immediate terms, while the movement generally can be credited with producing a hostile environment for ICE and Border Patrol agents. The true tactical diversity – from blockades, sabotage and divestment to popular education, mass marches and mutual aid – of Abolish ICE has been its greatest strength. This fluid repertoire of action has permitted participation of various form and allowed Abolish ICE to evade capture by NGOs or the Democratic Party. Divestment has been but one, crucial, component to this movement.

Who Next?

Although the #DivestfromICE movement has secured key victories recently, more work remains to be done. Other banks maintain investments in CoreCivic and GEO Group. CoreCivic and GEO also have large institutional shareholders who haven’t indicated they will relinquish their stock holdings. As leading financiers crumble under public pressure and exposure (or even the mere threat of pressure or exposure), now is the time to up the ante. Find what’s connected to ICE near you and organize!

Remaining Banks Invested in GEO Group and CoreCivic

According to financial data published in April 2019 (Bank of America, SunTrust and BNP have divested since), these are some of the larger banks continuing to issue term loans and revolving credit lines or are underwriting bonds to GEO and CoreCivic:

PNC Bank – CoreCivic.

Find PNC branches.

Barclays – GEO Group and CoreCivic (bond underwriter)

Find Barclays branches.

Citizens Bank  – CoreCivic.

Find citizens bank branches

Regions Bank – CoreCivic.

Find Regions Bank branches.

Fifth Third Bank – CoreCivic.

Find Fifth Third Bank branches.

Major Institutional Shareholders of GEO and CoreCivic

*This data was obtained through institutional holdings listings on NASDAQ and was last updated on 3/31/2019. Total stock values are rounded. To find exact holding values use the NASDAQ website for GEO or CoreCivic. Offices listed may or may not be accessible to the public.

Vanguard Group – CoreCivic and GEO Group

Vanguard offices.

BlackRock – CoreCivic and GEO Group

BlackRock offices.

Prudential Financial – CoreCivic and GEO Group

Prudential offices.

State Street Corp – CoreCivic and GEO Group

State Street Corp offices.

Categories: News

Stephanie Rearick on the Mutual Aid Networks

Grassroots Economic Survival - Thu, 07/18/2019 - 18:20
Link: Forward Forum: Stephanie Rearick on the Mutual Aid Networks 6/26/15

Stephanie Rearick speaks with Forward Forum host John Quinlan on the Mutual Aid Networks creating a legal, social and financial framework to help people redesign their work lives, by creating more comprehensive and resilient kinds of resource sharing and exchange.

Watch more videos from John Quinlan

 

Go to the GEO front page

Categories: News

The Flight of Fulvia Ferrari

Anarchist News - Thu, 07/18/2019 - 15:56

From The Transmetropolitan Review

The Flight of Fulvia Ferrari from Perenelle Flamel on Vimeo.

Fulvia Ferrari was the daughter of a San Francisco anarchist named Enrico Travaglio, although few ever knew this to be true. After her mother Isabelle disappeared in Russia, Fulvia went searching for her in the 1930s only to end up imprisoned in a German concentration camp. Once the US Army liberated the survivors, Fulvia returned to San Francisco under a false name and tried to reclaim the lost worlds of the anarchist Latin Quarter and insurgent Telegraph Hill. When she’d finally achieved some of these goals, Fulvia decided to meet with her father, although she never called him that, preferring to use his first name: Enrico.

Columbus and Broadway, Latin Quarter/North Beach, San Francisco, 1930

Fulvia was born in 1915 and grew up in a Mendocino County commune just north of San Francisco. She moved to San Francisco in the early 1930s and it was here that she first met her father. After returning from Seattle in the 1920s with his third wife Esther, Enrico settled in the bayside town of Sausalito before moving back to his beloved San Francisco. According to the oral histories compiled by Paul Avrich in his Anarchist Voices, Enrico was “fiercely anti-Bolshevik after the Russian Revolution and broke with some of his friends who became Communists.” While he was still living in Sausalito, Enrico would “meet Eric Morton on the San Francisco Ferry,” although according to his wife Leah, “they never talked about anything important.”

Promotional material for Sausalito Ferry, 1920s

Eric Morton was no ordinary anarchist, and just like Enrico Travaglio, he was also a sailor. When Alexander Berkman was imprisoned for his assassination attempt against Henry Clay Frick, it was Eric Morton who attempted to a dig a tunnel to rescue him. Eric Morton helped Emma Goldman smuggle dynamite and arms into Russia between 1905 and 1907, edited The Blast newspaper with Alexander Berkman, and remained in San Francisco to fight the local Italian fascists during the rise of Mussolini. According to Emma Goldman in her 1931 autobiography, Eric Morton was “a man of intelligence, daring, and will-power.” When he would meet with Enrico Travaglio on the San Francisco Ferry in the 1920s, the Russian Revolution now a decade past, these two men were certainly discussing the future. A few years later, when Enrico had moved back to San Francisco, his secret daughter appeared at the front door, looking for her mother Isabelle.

The 1920s and 1930s were a violent time in the former Latin Quarter of San Francisco, now known as North Beach. As fascists took over the Italian state, their local supporters became more aggressive on the streets, triggering bloody clashes over the next decade. Between 1926 and 1927, the local Catholic Church was hit with four bomb blasts, a campaign that targeted the church for its support of Mussolini. During the fifth attempted blast, two anarchists were shot by police before they could light the bomb and one of them soon died from his wounds.

Aftermath of bomb blast, Richmond District, San Francisco, 1927

In 1927, two Italian anarchists were transporting a bomb through the Richmond District of San Francisco when it suddenly went off. Rather than blow up the Italian Consulate as planned, Angelo Luca lost a leg while his comrade was instantly killed. Despite receiving a permanent wound, Angelo denied any knowledge of the bomb and was never charged with a crime. A decade earlier in 1917, he’d married a painter named Jessey Dorr, one of the first graduates from the all-woman Mill’s College in Oakland. Just before she married an insurrectionary anarcho-communist, Jessey had burnt all of her canvases and swore to never paint again, an event that signaled her shift away from the bohemian world (although a few of her paintings survived). She lived with Angelo in a house in the Mission District at 650 Capp Street and raised their two children, one of whom became an art and sculpture lecturer at UC Berkeley. For the rest of his life, the family of Angelo Luca would remain close friends with Enrico Travaglio.

Jessey Dorr, 1970s, with her painting “Off to the Oyster Beds”

In the middle of classical fascism’s rise, the massive 1934 Waterfront Strike took place in San Francisco, a violent labor conflict that left nine people dead, including Fulvia’s three uncles. While this effort led to a General Strike and the creation of the ILWU union, it also caused a wave of repression against the perceived Communists who’d infiltrated the labor movement. Using modern machine guns and federal soldiers, the bosses subdued the strike just as Hitler was throwing anarchists and communists into concentration camps. In this horrible time period, Fulvia decided to leave San Francisco to find her lost mother, the last surviving member of her family besides Enrico, who she hardly knew.

San Francisco Waterfront, 1934

When she returned in 1947, having lived through Stalin’s USSR and the Nazi’s concentration camps, Fulvia immediately reclaimed her family’s lost waterfront territory. After she was secure in her new San Francisco life, Fulvia met with her father in 1951 and began a relationship that would span the rest of Enrico’s life. While never revealing who she was to Enrico’s wife, Fulvia met with her father on a regular basis, hoping to rebuild the anarchist world he’d lost. In the process, she read Enrico’s elusive history of anarchism in the United States, learned the secrets that led up to her birth, and discovered her father was born in Milano, just like her maternal grandfather Antonio.

Italians listening to Mussolini broadcast, 1930s, Columbus and Broadway

During the late 1940s, the nephew of IWW leader Elizabeth Gurley Flynn and the son of Carlo Tresca moved to San Francisco and began working as a sociology teacher. In 1953, he opened City Lights Bookstore with Lawrence Ferlinghetti before returning to New York a few years later. The bookstore is still there on the corner of Broadway and Columbus, the former gathering spot where fascists had once listened to Mussolini’s radio broadcasts. During the late 1950s, it would become a major center of the beat movement and publish books that mentioned the Wobblies, anarchism, and the gone world of their parents generation. Fulvia Ferrari was often there.

City Lights Books, Broadway and Columbus, 1952

In 1956, during one of their meetings, Enrico asked Fulvia to visit his old hometown and do what she could to help the anarchist movement. Starting that year, Fulvia began a series of trips to Northern Italy that culminated with her involvement in the Torino Fiat Strike and the Piazza Statuo Riots of 1962. It’s this period in Fulvia’s life, between 1956 and 1962, that we’ve documented in our short film The Flight of Fulvia Ferrari. While posing as an art dealer, Fulvia’s trips across the ocean helped divert money into the anarchist movement and breathed new life into the global struggle. With her lover, she also smuggled weapons onto the Cape Verde Islands and Guinea Bissau from the late 1950s to the early 1960s, helping the anti-colonial rebels begin their uprising against the Portuguese. Despite her efforts, Moscow eventually stepped in to replace their operation. This pattern would only repeat itself.

Fulvia returned from Torino in 1963 and remained in San Francisco until the late 1970s, a moment when she was forced to permanently leave her beloved coastline. In 1968, she’d sat in front of the television with Enrico and watched as the Parisian riots of May filled the screen, a spectacle that brought great joy to her old father. With militant struggles breaking out across the planet, Enrico Travaglio died happy in July of 1968. His friend Angelo Luca would pass away four years later in 1972, followed by his wife Jessey in 1977. By then, most of the old-school anarchists had moved south to Los Gatos where they had “picnics from time to time to raise money for the Italian and English anarchist press.” Years after Fulvia vanished from the San Francisco Bay Area, these anarchists continued to reside in Los Gatos, with many of their children still living in the region. The last of these elders who gave their oral histories to Paul Avrich died in 1993. Most of them were born in the 19th century. Today, their final refuge of Los Gatos is the home of Netflix corporate headquarters.

While we were completing this third installment of our series on Fulvia Ferrari, the actress who stood-in for Fulvia passed away from natural causes. Valentina Cortese, born in Milano in 1923, became a movie actress during the fascist dictatorship and starred in her first role in 1940 at the age of seventeen. Her first two films were made at Cinecittà studios, a film-production company established by Benito Mussolini that carried the slogan: Cinema is the most powerful weapon. The studios were bombed in 1943, the same year over one thousand Jews were taken from Rome to Auschwitz. Like many other artists, writers, directors, communists, and anarchists who lived in Italy through these events, Valentina didn’t do very much to fight against the dictatorship during the 1940s, and most spent the rest of their lives trying to redeem themselves. Once the war was over, Cinecittà became a refuge camp for two years before returning to film production. Since then, the studio has tried to forget its origins.

Valentina Cortese, 1948

After the end of WWII, Valentina signed a contract with 20th Century Fox and began filming movies with US directors. Her first role during in this time period was in the 1949 noir-film Thieves Highway, filmed almost entirely in San Francisco. It’s a massively subversive film with the notion of “free-enterprise” heavily critiqued. It depicts a Greek sailor just returned from WWII who’s instantly exploited by the market and turns to a waterfront sex-worker for help. Valentina knew exactly what kind of film she was making and was allowed the freedom to deliver her best performance. The director was Jules Dassin, a former Communist who’d renounced his affiliations with the Party when Stalin made a non-aggression pact with Hitler. Despite his hatred for state communism, Dassin was soon put on the Hollywood Blacklist and completely shut out from the US film industry.

Valentina Cortese, 1949

Unlike him, Valentina Cortese continued to make movies for Hollywood but was never given the full-on star treatment or elevated to the heights of her Anglo-Saxon peers. According to an interview Valentina gave in 2012, “I could have remained in Hollywood for who knows how long, but I never made compromises. Never was in a producer’s bed.” Because of her refusal to sleep with an unnamed director, Valentina’s career was destroyed. She remained independent her whole life, acting in a Brecht play and an Antonioni film, and she died last week in Rome on July 10, 2019. May she rest in peace, and may these images from her films bring you closer to a better world.

Long live Fulvia Ferrari! Long live Valentina Cortese!

Tags: San Franciscovideo
Categories: News

Anarchist Comrade In Canada Released

Anarchist News - Thu, 07/18/2019 - 15:32

From Anarchist Black Cross

Anarchist comrade Cedar Hopperton has been released after spending nearly a month in jail for allegedly violating their parole conditions after giving a speech arguing that police should not be part of the queer community and applauding those at Pride who stood up to the police and fascists.

Despite the fact that they weren’t at Pride, Cedar spent weeks in jail in a clear case of retaliation by the Hamilton police against Cedar for expressing their anarchist convictions. Cedar went on hunger strike after their arrest, and the queer and anarchist communities of Hamilton mobilized in their support.

The Tower, an anarchist social space in Hamilton, posted on Facebook Tuesday that Cedar was free, along with a photo of Cedar holding a “Free Cedar” poster.

“The rumours are true, and this time it’s a good thing — Cedar is free!” The Tower said. “A statement with more details is forthcoming.”

Asaf Rashid, Cedar’s lawyer in the parole board challenge, confirmed that Cedar was released in relation to some credited time around their incarceration. Cedar was initially due to be released at the end of July.

The parole board dismissed the false claim by Hamilton police that Cedar was at Pride.

Cedar’s release is a victory for the anarchist movement in Hamilton and beyond and a defeat for the oppressive Hamilton police force.

Tags: Hamiltoncedaranarchists in trouble
Categories: News

Washington, DC: Report from the Anti-Fascist Mobilization of July 6

Anarchist News - Thu, 07/18/2019 - 15:28

From CrimethInc.

With Reflections on the Past and Future of Anti-Fascist Tactics

On July 6, fascists attempted to hold a “Demand Free Speech”1 rally in Washington, DC. Anarchists and DC Black Lives Matter mobilized in response. Although the massive police presence hampered what anti-fascists could do, the fascist rally was not a success, confirming that anti-fascists have largely succeeded in thwarting the street-level fascist movement that many feared would emerge in the Trump era. The question, now, is how we can employ the tactics we have popularized in the anti-fascist movement—black blocs, de-platforming, and —in other movements and contexts.

Here, we offer a short report from DC on how previous mobilizations in DC have informed the strategies they employ today and an account of the day’s events.

A group of neo-fascists promised to bring out 1000 people to a rally in Washington, DC on July 6, including 100 or more battle-ready Proud Boys. The rally had big names associated with it and local, institutional, and regional support; the organizers included Enrique Tarrio, chairman of the Proud Boys. Because it was sandwiched between Donald Trump’s 4th of July rally and “Christians United For Israel,” a major gathering of the Christian right, DC anti-fascists feared that this event could draw a much larger turnout than recent far-right events had in the area. If a new right-wing coalition emerged that could put numbers back into the streets, that would mean another round of draining confrontations between fascists and anti-fascists.

In the end, the “Demand Free Speech Rally” was disorganized and undermined by infighting. Their event was a bust: it brought out dozens, not a thousand. The Proud Boys, which seemed like the last group standing among the fascist organizations of two years ago, couldn’t muster the 100 attendees they promised. Identity Evropa also made a last-minute push and failed to bring out the numbers they anticipated.

While repugnant characters like Adrienna DiCioccio and Jack Posebiac have huge Twitter followings, that doesn’t translate into an on-the-ground street movement. They are social media grifters who consider a trending hashtag more important than the kind of organizing that can mobilize people. They can use their platforms to create misinformation campaigns that cause police to crack down on anti-fascists, but they lack the relationships, skills, and political savvy to produce mass turnout for their own events.

Of course, that doesn’t mean they can’t learn those skills. We were not born with those skills either. We have to remain vigilant, mobilizing resistance whenever there is a chance that fascists will succeed in their publicity stunts, so they are never positively reinforced for their efforts to recruit.

Over the past two and a half years, organizers in DC have learned harsh lessons about the risks of collective action. DC anarchists were shocked when DC police chose to mass-arrest and then mass-prosecute over 200 people for the courageous actions of January 20, 2017. The preceding 10 years of comparatively restrained police tactics had made DC anarchists complacent. We had conceded ground to liberals when we should have been developing strategies that could prepare us for the moment when that scenario changed.

The now infamous Anti-Capitalist and Anti-fascist Bloc that responded to the inauguration of Donald Trump was isolated from the majority of people on the street in DC that day, leaving it vulnerable to repression. In setting out to deepen our relations with other social movements, local anarchists aim to ensure that we cannot be isolated from our communities.



One role the black bloc can play is to defend those who are vulnerable to police attacks. On July 6, the bloc mobilized when we heard a large number of fascists were close to the park; our goal was to preserve space for people from targeted communities.

Just a year ago, anarchists were asked to stay out of the sites of permitted demonstrations for fear of mass arrests and police violence. Our recent efforts to connect with others have enabled us to make space for anarchist actions in a way that was not possible between 2016 and 2018. Building and deepening relationships takes time, patience, and understanding. We hope that these efforts will equip us to be better prepared for demonstrations in DC in the future, the next time anarchists and anti-fascists mobilize.

When we act, ideally we should be swimming in a sea of people, not alone against the stream of police repression. Different tactics make us stronger and sharing space makes those tactical experiments safer. It’s harder to make a bugaboo out of the black bloc when other people in the streets know who we are and what we are there to do.

Don’t Mute DC

Earlier this year, white gentrifiers demanded that Shaw’s Metro PCS store shut off the music it has been playing for over 20 years. In the 1990s, Metro PCS was rocking Go-Go outside and selling beepers, back when the U Street corridor was known as “Black Broadway.” Formerly known as Chocolate City, DC has been seeing Go-Go events pushed out of the city into Maryland.

https://twitter.com/legbacarrefour/status/1147562211025534976

Go-Go is a historically Black music that developed in Washington, DC—a homegrown variant of funk, old-school hip-hop, and R&B music, founded by DC legend Chuck Brown. The disappearance of Go-Go from nearly every neighborhood illustrates the displacement of Black people from DC.

A massive community-led response to the pressure on Metro PCS brought thousands out to U Street in the face of policing and gentrification. Later in spring 2019, Metro PCS returned Go-Go music to Chuck Brown Way. While police have been shutting down these shows, communities have been using Go-Go dance parties as a form of resistance to gentrification in DC.

When anarchists, Black Lives Matter activists, and local anti-fascists became aware of the right-wing mobilization, we believed it would be important to hold space for Black, Brown, and Indigenous joy in the face of white supremacy. We set out to help bring together social movements in a way that would secure the safety of DC residents and give the protest a specifically DC atmosphere.

Before the Demonstration

While DC organizers believed that this could be a large mobilization, the material force the Proud Boys promised didn’t show. It was a far cry from the “thousand give or take a few hundred” they predicted to the park service.

Leading up to the mobilization, we intentionally did not discuss their politics. We just branded their event for them, clarifying for everyone that it was part of the same fascist current as previous such demonstrations in DC. A week before the demonstration, public pressure compelled the Spy Museum to publicly denounce the alt-right and cancel their VIP event.

In a last-minute attempt to mobilize supporters and escalate the likelihood of right-wing violence, far-right media began circulating rumors about “antifa acid attacks.” Numerous Proud Boys used this opportunity to announce that they planned to carry loaded guns. On the other hand, these rumors also provided cover for several of the speakers to cancel in the face of public pressure from DC antifascists. Jack Posebiac, Mike Cernovich, and Omar Navarrow all backed out before the rally.

Roger Stone was a no-show. Laura Loomer blamed antifa for the rally ending early. All in all, their rally was logistical failure, with numerous events ending early and lacking attendance.

Tactically Unimpressive, But Politically Successful?

10:30 am, at the beginning of the rally—Black Lives Matter organizers explicitly expressed support for the black bloc. “See the people with masks over their faces, and in all black? Those are our people. They are here to keep us safe because police don’t. We keep each other safe.” As the demonstration got underway, crowds gathered against the backdrop of DC’s homegrown funk while anti-fascist speakers from different communities alternated with bands brought in by anti-fascists of color and Black Lives Matter DC.

https://twitter.com/Julio_Rosas11/status/1147554817524543488

https://twitter.com/ChuckModi1/status/1147556685361405952

Around 11:30 am, as the rally was getting started, groups of right-wing journalists repeatedly attempted to film the demonstration without the consent of organizers or the community at large. Organizers aimed to create an atmosphere characterized by consent and solidarity in which the attendees would actively prevent fascists from attacking community members. At one point, a group of drag queens chased out a group of fascists.

https://twitter.com/UR_Ninja/status/1147577101610029056

This began a skirmish between fascists and anti-fascists. As this unfolded, some of them continued heckling and attempting to film. Numerous Proud Boys and their supporters repeatedly came over and were chased away by community members, not just participants in the bloc.

For those not in the streets in DC on July 6, the black bloc was hardly the wrecking ball we were on J20. There are no smashed windows to write about, no video clips of Richard Spencer being punched in the face. The most exciting moments of the day were funny rather than inspiring—for example, playing tug of war with police over a newspaper box.

Around 1:30 pm, the bloc took the streets to confront Identity Evropa, who were a block away from their permitted rally.



Other participants in the movement are no longer seeking to police our actions, but the police are still eager to suppress even the most mundane acts of rebellion.

https://twitter.com/ChuckModi1/status/1147551469111062529

At 5:30 pm, anarchists, Black Lives Matter, and other rally attendees met up again in front of Trump hotel. Despite hundreds of police, several dozen people were able to hold their ground in front of the VIP Bus, delaying its departure by over an hour and a half. The bus, which was supposed to leave by 6:30, left around 8 pm for an undisclosed location in Northern Virginia.

In short, while the day can hardly be said to be a tactical victory, we were able to diminish and contain the threat that the rally posed to our communities. It’s for the best that we didn’t have to physically fight a large group of fascists, in any case.



Towards the Future

Days after the #DemandFreeSpeech rally, the “Mother of All Rallies” organizers cancelled their annual pro-Trump demonstration. They cited censorship on social media, but it’s significant that this occurred days after the flop of the “free speech” demonstration.

When we think about the future—about how to make sure we gain strength and our opposition lays dormant—we need to reflect on the limitations we have experienced in this era and how to make sure we don’t repeat the mistakes of the past.

In many different mobilizations, we have repeatedly confronted the same issues. When there is a small minority of people who feel comfortable standing up to the police, how do we relate to others who are not prepared to? How do we address the questions of timing and the safety of participants both inside and outside the bloc? When should we push the envelope, and when should we play a supporting role?

If we want to increase our ability to act and build relationships with other revolutionary movements, these are important questions. But we can think bigger about what we do next. How do we push for militant resistance in the face of border militarization, concentration camps, police killing, and state violence? How do we take the focus from individual fascists towards state-sanctioned racial violence.

As we look forward to replicating the success of mass anti-fascism, we can look to use the skills we’ve built in other arenas. The Republican Party’s vision, while not quite as overt as Richard Spencer’s program, still includes systemic ethnic cleansing and concentration camps for children. How can we map the relationships that create these policies? How can we build campaigns that make it unpopular to support racialized policing and mass incarceration? How do we use research, counter-intelligence, social mapping, and street militancy against ICE and prisons? How do we use these skills in mutual aid projects as well?

On one hand, we have to build the ability to sustain and intensify our offensive organizing. On the other hand, we have to support each another through crisis capitalism.











  1. Rather than the kind of state-enforced “freedom of speech” in which armored riot police bludgeon the general population while fascists call for even more violence, anarchists seek real freedom, in which communities can self-organize to defend against the violence of police and fascists alike. 

Tags: crimethinc.antifaWashington DCstrategy
Categories: News

Reflections on Anti-Olympics Resistance in Vancouver

Anarchist News - Thu, 07/18/2019 - 15:22

From From Embers, Jul 18, 2019

Reflections on Anti-Olympics Resistance in Vancouver

Jul 18, 2019

A conversation with an anarchist who was around during the height of the 2010 anti-Olympics resistance in Vancouver. We talk about the impact the Olympics has had on the social climate, the surveillance experienced by anarchists and other organizers, and the infamous Heart Attack demo that tore up the city's downtown core.

Tags: From EmberspodcastCanada
Categories: News

Announcement and Call for Submissions! Oak: A Journal Against Civilization

Anarchist News - Thu, 07/18/2019 - 15:18

From It's Going Down

A call to participate in a new anarchist journal, entitled, Oak, from an anti-civilization perspective.

There is no food that means more to me than the acorn, for the acorn fulfills both a promise and a fantasy: that the forest will provide for me.

– Samuel Thayer

Issue 1: Perpetual Apocalypse – Spring 2020

Few things are as breathtaking as a forest of oak and its many expressions. The incredible symphony of falling acorns — a harbinger of bounty and community. For millennia the acorn has provided food for humanity and countless other species. The promise and resilience of the oak stands as a reminder of possibility. It’s likely that for thousands of years fires were set, not just to create areas for game, but to preferentially seed oak trees. It seems fitting that we should show homage to the ubiquitous oak by celebrating it in our title.

Since I can remember there’s been unceasing division within the anarchist and anti-civilization milieus, both at large and in my immediate experience. It seems we’re always knives first, taking aim at the comfortable targets a few degrees away from us. While I’m all for good sparring practice, I believe the connections must remain if we are to survive and thrive.

The possibility of maintaining an intimate and dynamic meshwork of communication is real. In the wake of civilized life, finding someone — anyone — who also chooses to reject the dominant paradigm of perpetual nightmare should be exhilarating. There will always be lines to draw, many of them are already drawn for us by the active overlords and domesticators. But many other lines are blurry at best and, given our context, meaningless at worst. Too many disagreements in the digital age end in snarky division articulated via electronic communication, a pathetic reality not worthy of our once-wild selves.

So here, in Oak, we will attempt to let those divisions fizzle in the ether of the internet. We may still draw lines and gnash teeth in these pages, but it will be in the realm of action — the realm of articulated living — that we will brandish our weapons, both literal and figurative.

The battles ahead are more meaningful than suffixes and prefixes added for personal identification; words will be spoken out loud that make the clattering disagreements coming through keyboards and illuminated screens seem less than petty. The world is literally dying. Some form of it will always exist; the wild, the uncontrollable will always prevail. But until that time when we are dust and bones, I hope we can tie our meshwork of personalities and ideas together, spar as needed, and realize some semblance of a world (perhaps many different worlds) without civilization.

***

We are looking for all relevant works to the anti-civilization and anarcho-primitivist discourse. All submissions will be reviewed with care and with the intent to publish as many as possible, working directly with authors over any editorial concerns.

Oak will be magazine format, hopefully with available funds for at least a color cover. The exact format will be determined based on the scope and content of submissions, as well as available funds. Oak will operate with the goal of being interesting to the passerby and attractive to the inquisitive. Currently Oak is scheduled as a bi-annual.

In addition to print, each issue will be produced as an audiozine. We are looking forward to curating interviews, readings, music and much more in a multi-episode production of each issue.

Please submit any work by November 30th, 2019 or get in touch by November 15th if you need more time on a longer piece.  Submission guidelines are being developed, until then we ask for endnotes rather than footnotes and consistent document formatting in each submission.

We are looking specifically for pieces that look at some of the following (don’t consider this list exhaustive):

  • Pipeline blockades and diversity of tactics, including perspectives from the front-lines
  • Forest defense updates
  • Resistance dynamics amidst rising state fascism and exponential climate change
  • Subsistence journals, wild experiences, lessons learned from living with and through the land
  • Anti-civilization praxis, challenges and ideas

Some brief words on this issue’s theme of Perpetual Apocalypse: Worlds have been and are being destroyed. In each instance of devastation, from the perspective of life within each area, each multiplicity of connectivity, the apocalypse was and is real. The death of the planetary world as a singular event is not within the capacity of the human experience, thus apocalypse is both perpetual and unending in civilized life — we merely see each apocalypse from a voyeur’s perspective. How much longer do the spectators have before the fire is no longer just illuminated pixels?

The theme is nothing more than possible inspiration, though pieces that are inspired by it are of course appreciated. We are aiming for a vibrant, diverse and engaging magazine of anti-civilization thought, practice and, above all, life.

– Steve Kirk for Oak Journal

All recipients are encouraged to forward this announcement to relevant parties and not the cops. Please reach out with ideas, inspirations, criticisms, etc: oakjournal@protonmail.com

Tags: journalanti-civcall for submissions
Categories: News

FANG Collective Member Statement on Resisting ICE

It's Goin Down - Thu, 07/18/2019 - 09:33

The post FANG Collective Member Statement on Resisting ICE appeared first on It's Going Down.

Statement from a member of the FANG Collective who begins a short jail sentence on fighting ICE.

Earlier today Amory began an eight day jail sentence for resisting ICE in Bristol County, Massachusetts. PLEASE READ Amory’s statement that they released before beginning their sentence:

“Last summer, some friends and I demonstrated outside the Bristol County Jail, a jail and ICE detention center in North Dartmouth, MA. We were there to protest the caging of human beings––by ICE and the rest of the carceral system, too––and to support the prisoners’ hunger strike. After police officers recklessly and haphazardly tore two of us out of our tripods and jackhammered Holly and I out of our blockade, the four of us sat in jail overnight. Today, after a long and confusing legal proceeding, I am returning to a jail cell for 10 days for that action.

I wouldn’t say I’m optimistic or pessimistic about a future without incarceration and other weapons of colonial control. Rather, I am certain that the future is an infinite compilation of presents, and what we choose to pursue now creates the next now. I am certain that through action, a world without ICE, without prisons, police, or military of any kind is not just possible, but inevitable if we decide it is. Blocking entry to a detention center is just one action among many we can take to chase that future.

The New Bedford District Court knows this sentence is a repressive political strategy to discourage dissent. This may put us away for a week and a half each, but it will not cover the shame of caging people and their children for being born on the other side of an arbitrary colonial border, of the state’s history of incarcerating and brutalizing Black and Indigenous people, of buttressing the US military’s crimes against humanity, of continued environmental devastation the state oversees, or of sustaining an irredeemable nation built by stolen labor from stolen people on stolen land. Nor will it cover the necessity of continued opposition to ICE; in fact, it exposes how scared the state is of our power, and how impactful we can be should we choose to forego fear of these courts.

Being 19 years old makes me 4 years older than ICE. Envisioning a future without such a law enforcement agency doesn’t require any imagination; we’ve very recently lived in a world without it. If we can envision a future without ICE, we can dream of a world where the notion of “citizenship” is an unpleasant memory, composted into a flourishing decolonized present — I can, anyway, and it’s wonderful. Without ICE, we can start to see a world without other forms of police, borders, and militaries. So what actions are necessary to grow this? What can we do in this present?

Hey, by the way, speaking of actionable things: Sherrie Andre, a co-defendant and one of the coolest people I’ve had the privilege of sharing space/action with, is still fighting their charges. If you can, you should come to their court dates to support them!

After I sit in jail for 10 days, many others will stay longer, with less support than me, with fewer resources after getting out. This sentence, heavy handed as it is, is nowhere near the worst the courts have slapped people with. My hope, then, is that those who support us and advocate our freedom will extend that compassion to every victim of incarceration. Every single prisoner is a political prisoner, and every single one deserves our solidarity. Nutty, an activist fighting the Mountain Valley Pipeline in Appalachia (and whose beautifully eloquent statements are the main inspiration for this one), said it best:

“Fuck the liberal ideologies of people who take offense at the punishments endured by some land defenders while they proclaim how distinct we are from those who share our jail cells. The courts are wrong for prosecuting us. And they are wrong for prosecuting all those who lack the extensive networks of support that our movement provides. The courts take people in the hardest moments of their lives and make them even harder, steal people from their families, jail them for not having the money for bail and then imprison them for not being able to afford a fancy lawyer.”

Instead of courts, cops, and any arms of the state which help white supremacists and capitalists lock children and families in cages and profit off it, instead of prisons descended from slavery and Jim Crow, what we need is solidarity and radical neighborly love for each other. We need to see no one as disposable and everyone as precious. And ultimately, we need to be free to grow together beyond what white supremacy would have divide us. Strong communities make the state obsolete.

Thank you to the people who came to the courthouse to support me today. My love and rage goes out to organizers and friends everywhere fighting ICE and linked oppressive machines, as well as those gathering the courage to get involved now. Together, we are sowing the seeds of a better world.”

***

Amory is the second person to serve a jail sentence after taking part in the August 2018 action that shut down the entrances of the Bristol County House of Corrections. The action was carried out in solidarity with people being held by ICE who went on hunger strike to demand better conditions at the facility.

You can read more about FANG’s #ShutDownICE campaign, and the action that Amory participated in here: https://shutdownicenow.org/

Tomorrow at 9am at New Bedford District Court, Sherrie, who took part in this action has a hearing. Please come out to support Sherrie: https://www.facebook.com/events/398928017418047/

And you can pledge to take action to resist ICE here: bit.ly/ShutDownICE

#End287g #AbolishICE

Categories: News

Announcement and Call for Submissions! Oak: A Journal Against Civilization

It's Goin Down - Thu, 07/18/2019 - 09:23

The post Announcement and Call for Submissions! Oak: A Journal Against Civilization appeared first on It's Going Down.

A call to participate in a new anarchist journal, entitled, Oak, from an anti-civilization perspective.

There is no food that means more to me than the acorn, for the acorn fulfills both a promise and a fantasy: that the forest will provide for me.

– Samuel Thayer

Issue 1: Perpetual Apocalypse – Spring 2020

Few things are as breathtaking as a forest of oak and its many expressions. The incredible symphony of falling acorns — a harbinger of bounty and community. For millennia the acorn has provided food for humanity and countless other species. The promise and resilience of the oak stands as a reminder of possibility. It’s likely that for thousands of years fires were set, not just to create areas for game, but to preferentially seed oak trees. It seems fitting that we should show homage to the ubiquitous oak by celebrating it in our title.

Since I can remember there’s been unceasing division within the anarchist and anti-civilization milieus, both at large and in my immediate experience. It seems we’re always knives first, taking aim at the comfortable targets a few degrees away from us. While I’m all for good sparring practice, I believe the connections must remain if we are to survive and thrive.

The possibility of maintaining an intimate and dynamic meshwork of communication is real. In the wake of civilized life, finding someone — anyone — who also chooses to reject the dominant paradigm of perpetual nightmare should be exhilarating. There will always be lines to draw, many of them are already drawn for us by the active overlords and domesticators. But many other lines are blurry at best and, given our context, meaningless at worst. Too many disagreements in the digital age end in snarky division articulated via electronic communication, a pathetic reality not worthy of our once-wild selves.

So here, in Oak, we will attempt to let those divisions fizzle in the ether of the internet. We may still draw lines and gnash teeth in these pages, but it will be in the realm of action — the realm of articulated living — that we will brandish our weapons, both literal and figurative.

The battles ahead are more meaningful than suffixes and prefixes added for personal identification; words will be spoken out loud that make the clattering disagreements coming through keyboards and illuminated screens seem less than petty. The world is literally dying. Some form of it will always exist; the wild, the uncontrollable will always prevail. But until that time when we are dust and bones, I hope we can tie our meshwork of personalities and ideas together, spar as needed, and realize some semblance of a world (perhaps many different worlds) without civilization.

***

We are looking for all relevant works to the anti-civilization and anarcho-primitivist discourse. All submissions will be reviewed with care and with the intent to publish as many as possible, working directly with authors over any editorial concerns.

Oak will be magazine format, hopefully with available funds for at least a color cover. The exact format will be determined based on the scope and content of submissions, as well as available funds. Oak will operate with the goal of being interesting to the passerby and attractive to the inquisitive. Currently Oak is scheduled as a bi-annual.

In addition to print, each issue will be produced as an audiozine. We are looking forward to curating interviews, readings, music and much more in a multi-episode production of each issue.

Please submit any work by November 30th, 2019 or get in touch by November 15th if you need more time on a longer piece.  Submission guidelines are being developed, until then we ask for endnotes rather than footnotes and consistent document formatting in each submission.

We are looking specifically for pieces that look at some of the following (don’t consider this list exhaustive):

  • Pipeline blockades and diversity of tactics, including perspectives from the front-lines
  • Forest defense updates
  • Resistance dynamics amidst rising state fascism and exponential climate change
  • Subsistence journals, wild experiences, lessons learned from living with and through the land
  • Anti-civilization praxis, challenges and ideas

Some brief words on this issue’s theme of Perpetual Apocalypse: Worlds have been and are being destroyed. In each instance of devastation, from the perspective of life within each area, each multiplicity of connectivity, the apocalypse was and is real. The death of the planetary world as a singular event is not within the capacity of the human experience, thus apocalypse is both perpetual and unending in civilized life — we merely see each apocalypse from a voyeur’s perspective. How much longer do the spectators have before the fire is no longer just illuminated pixels?

The theme is nothing more than possible inspiration, though pieces that are inspired by it are of course appreciated. We are aiming for a vibrant, diverse and engaging magazine of anti-civilization thought, practice and, above all, life.

– Steve Kirk for Oak Journal

All recipients are encouraged to forward this announcement to relevant parties and not the cops. Please reach out with ideas, inspirations, criticisms, etc: oakjournal@protonmail.com

Categories: News

Pages